Tag Archive | "electronic cigarettes"

10 Electronic Cigarette Facts


The electronic cigarette is quickly rising in popularity as more smokers become aware of this healthier smoking alternative. For the first time an alternative nicotine delivery system is available that closely simulates a real smoking experience. Many people believe this will lead to countless smoker’s lives being saved. The e-cigarette is looking very promising and is already revolutionizing the way many people smoke… permanently.

However, because it’s a relatively new device that is just coming into public awareness, there is a lot of misinformation surrounding the electronic cigarette. Is it safe? Can it help you quit smoking? Is there a danger of more kids getting addicted to nicotine? These are all sensible questions that need to be addressed in order for you to make an intelligent decision whether this is something you could benefit from.

The following are a list of 10 FAQs about the electronic cigarette:

1. How close to the real thing is it? Very similar… enough to satisfy the most hardcore smokers. There are many reports of smokers with 1-2 pack a day habits completely switching over to e-cigarettes permanently. The vapor tastes, feels and looks like tobacco smoke. It delivers that instant nicotine satisfaction that smokers crave.

2. Is it safe? Tobacco smoke has over 4,000 toxic chemicals. Electronic smoking has none of these because there is no actual smoke involved. Smoke is the real health hazard. E-cigarettes deliver nicotine by inhaling a vaporized water/nicotine solution without having to worry about tar, carbon monoxide, etc.

A report by the Royal College of Physicians states that nicotine by itself has not been proven to cause any long term ill health effects. Electronic cigarette vapor has about 20 ingredients (including nicotine) all of which are considered safe as long as the proper instructions are followed.

3. Can it help me quit smoking? Electronic cigarettes are NOT marketed as smoking cessation devices. They are meant to be used by smokers who are seeking an alternative that can be used anywhere. That being said, common sense dictates that it definitely has potential to be an integral part of a sensible stop-smoking program (similar to how nicotine gum and patches are used).

4. Is it approved by the FDA? The e-cigarette is a nicotine delivery device and doesn’t fall under the jurisdiction of the FDA right now.

5. Why are certain groups so opposed to it? This is a complicated question. Certain groups may have the public’s best interests in mind and just want more clinical studies to be done. Others have a financial interest in trying to figure out the best way to capitalize on what is probably going to be a billion dollar industry soon.

6. Can it be used anywhere? Technically, yes. There is no burning tobacco so no second hand smoke is produced. Although it is totally acceptable in most public places, there are certain areas like restaurants that may not like the appearance of it. In these cases simply check with the staff first.

7. Does it target kids? Absolutely not! There is a lot of misinformation regarding this topic. Some anti-groups are claiming that because a variety of flavors like fruit, vanilla, chocolate, etc. are available this is going to appeal to kids. That’s like saying because nicotine gum comes in a variety of flavors like mint or fruit it’s catering to a younger crowd. Adults enjoy a variety of flavor choices too! The bottom line is the initial cost for an electronic cigarette starter kit (usually around $100 or so) is not practical for most kids. The market is adult smokers looking for a healthier alternative smoking choice.

8. What is the best e-cigarette? This is where you need to use a bit of discrimination. There has been a lot of cheap designs coming out of China that are wrought with mechanical problems. Luckily there are a handful of high-quality manufacturers out there. A little bit of research will help you decide. Just remember that sometimes it’s worth spending a few more dollars one time to ensure you get a high quality device that is capable of giving you an enjoyable and problem-free smoking experience.

9. How much does it cost? A quality starter kit (including rechargeable battery, charger and 5 nicotine cartridges) will run you around $100 – $150. A package of 5 cartridges will run you around $10 – $15. I cartridge is about the equivalent of 1 – 1.5 packs of cigarettes. Do the math. That’s the equivalent of paying around $2 – $3 per pack of cigarettes.

10. Where can I buy one? Because it’s still fairly new, not many stores are carrying these yet. The best deals can be found online.

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Are Electronic Cigarettes Safe?


Electronic cigarettes are being marketed as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco. But just how safe are e-cigarettes? Are there any health risks? Let’s examine electric smoking and compare it to “real” smoking so you can make an intelligent decision if this may be a wise smoking alternative for you.

The most harmful aspect of smoking cigarettes is the 4,000 toxic chemicals that are inhaled when you burn tobacco. It’s the actual smoke that is causing lung cancer and respiratory disease, not the nicotine. With electronic smoking none of these 4,000 toxic chemicals are produced because there is no smoke… nothing is actually burning. No smoke means no tar, carbon monoxide, etc.

But what about the nicotine? E-cigarettes still deliver nicotine. How dangerous is that? More independent studies on the effects of nicotine by itself need to be done. Right now the health risks are still inconclusive. Nevertheless, it’s obvious that a method of delivering nicotine that doesn’t involve real smoke is going to be much safer than burning tobacco.

The FDA recently reported that traces of carcinogens where found in a sample of electronic cigarette nicotine liquid. However, these same carcinogens are also found in nicotine delivery alternatives like the patch and gum (which are both approved by the FDA). Also keep in mind that many every day foods like peanut butter contain trace levels of carcinogens. This is not to say that we should not be concerned about it. Just keep it in perspective. It’s important to remember that the dose of a particular carcinogen is an important factor in it’s toxicity. If carcinogens are present in e-cigarette vapor, it doesn’t not appear to be in high doses. Right now there is no evidence that these carcinogens are are even translated into the actual electronic cigarette vapor that is inhaled.

Are electronic cigarettes totally safe? Until more studies are done it’s probably a good idea to err on the side of caution and assume that they are not 100% safe. But when you compare it to “real” smoking there really is no comparison. One thing we know for sure is that tobacco smoking is incredibly dangerous, expensive and inconvenient. E-cigarettes give smokers an alternative that appears to be much safer and will probably save countless lives. Given a choice between the two? I think it’s a no brainer.

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Electronic Cigarette Benefits


Electronic smoking is quickly rising in popularity and may change the way people smoke forever. Are you wondering if this is something that would benefit you or a loved one? Let’s examine some of the many benefits of the electronic cigarette as a sensible and healthier alternative to “real” smoking.

5 Benefits of the Electronic Cigarette:

1. Health. The most dangerous aspect of smoking is the actual smoke and the associated tar, carcinogens and other chemicals that are inhaled into the lungs. With an e-cigarette nothing is actually lit, so there is no smoke, tar or carcinogens. The nicotine is vaporized into a mist that looks and feels like smoke, but isn’t smoke. This is clearly a much healthier alternative.

2. Cost. The cost of the nicotine cartridges is where you really save a lot of money. An electronic cigarette nicotine cartridge is about the equivalent of 1 – 1.5 packs of tobacco cigarettes. A package of 5 cartridges will cost you around $15. This comes out to about $2-$3 per pack… this is a huge savings!

3. Convenience. You can smoke an e-cigarette anywhere because there is no smoke being emitted. You may get some funny looks if you suddenly start “vaping” in a restaurant or bar so you may want to get permission from management first. But technically you can do this in any public area because there is no second-hand smoke to be concerned with.

4. Smell. There is no lingering odor so no more worrying about stinky breath, hair, clothes, hands, etc. You won’t be offending anyone with second hand smoke and no one can complain about the smell.

5. Peace of mind. You will have the peace of mind knowing that you’re choosing a healthier alternative. True, you’re still absorbing nicotine but at least you’re avoiding the the incredibly dangerous smoke and 4,000 toxic chemicals associated with tobacco cigarettes.

A lot of people wonder if electronic smoking can help a person quit smoking altogether. There have not been enough clinical studies to prove this one way or another so this is still a debatable subject. However, other nicotine delivery alternatives like gum, patches, etc., are commonly used as a part of many stop-smoking approaches. Common sense would suggest that the electronic cigarette has the potential to do the same.

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Can Electronic Cigarettes Help You To Quit Smoking?


Can electronic cigarettes help you quit smoking ? Probably. But the companies who sell these devices are not in a position to tell you that. Because the FDA has not approved electronic cigarettes, they are not being sold as smoking cessation devices, but rather as a healthier “smoking alternative” for people who want smoke in public places.

E-cigarettes are an alternative nicotine delivery system. Common sense would dictate that they could be effectively used as part of an overall smoking cessation program, similar to the way nicotine gum, patches and inhalers are.

And here is an interesting fact about electronic cigarette nicotine cartridges: They come in several different nicotine levels – high, medium, low, and zero nicotine. Conceivably a person could slowly wean themselves from their nicotine addiction by progressively lowering their intake levels. It’s important to note that even a cartridge with a “high” nicotine level still delivers considerably less nicotine per inhale than a traditional cigarette.

So how many smokers successfully quit using the electronic cigarette? It’s too soon to say for sure and no organized studies have been performed to date. However, if one were to go to the numerous “vaping” forums they would see many testimonials of people who have kicked the habit for good using these devices. Some of these success stories are from people who have smoked over a pack a day for decades.

Until in-depth clinical studies are done, we are going to have to rely on anecdotal testimonials and our own reasonable judgement. Do your research and educate yourself on the facts. Then you will be well equipped to make and intelligent adult decision if this is something that can help you quit smoking.

Here’s the bottom line: No device, even one as promising as the e-cigarette, is going to be a “silver bullet” that can make a smoker quit overnight. Successfully quiting forever starts with a strong conviction to quit. If a person truly wants to quit then the electronic cigarette may prove to be a very helpful tool in realizing that goal.

But let’s face it… many smokers DON”T want to quit! They just enjoy smoking too much. For this group, electronic smoking can be a much healthier alternative… hopefully one that will keep them alive a lot longer.

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Electronic Cigarettes and the FDA


Electronic cigarettes, the FDA, anti-freeze and teenagers… how are these four connected?

Apparently the FDA found small traces of diethylene glycol, an ingredient used in antifreeze, in one sample of electronic cigarette solution they analyzed. They are also concerned that teenagers will get addicted to electronic smoking. How serious are these issues? Are e-cigarettes harmful devices that should be banned? Lets get the facts straight and put all this information into perspective.

Diethylene glycol may be a toxic ingredient but exactly how toxic is it?

1. It is has one-tenth the toxicity of aspirin.
2. It has one-fortieth the toxicity of nicotine (the primary ingredient in electronic cigarette vapor).

Diethylene glycol is also found in everyday consumable products like:

- Toothpaste
- Mouthwash
- Cough syrup
- Wine
- Dog food
- And many others…

You have to wonder why the FDA is focusing so much on the minute traces of diethylene glycol found in one sample when clearly this is a very common ingredient many of us are ingesting regularly.

That’s not to say that diethylene glycol is totally harmless and we shouldn’t have any concerns about it. But when the FDA starts focusing on words like ‘diethylene glycol’ and ‘anti-freeze’ it sure does sound scary. However, a little bit of education on the facts puts it back in perspective doesn’t it? By the way, water is another ingredient found in anti-freeze!

The FDA tends to give the impression that they have regulatory control over nicotine. That is not always the case. They regulate smoking cessation products and claims. That’s why electronic cigarettes are marketed as a smoking alternative and not as a means to quit smoking.

Another “concern” expressed by the FDA is that electronic cigarettes target underage kids. Here is an FDA quote from one of their reports:

“These products are marketed and sold to young people and are readily available online and in shopping malls. They are also available in different flavors, such as chocolate and mint, which may appeal to young people”.

There is absolutely zero evidence that e-cigarettes target teenagers. Just the opposite… the marketing is focused on adults who already smoke and are searching for a healthier alternative they can use in public places. And here is some breaking news: Adults like to shop in malls and enjoy a variety of flavor choices too! Besides, the initial cost of entry for a top of the line electronic cigarette is not practical for most teenagers.

I encourage you to do your own due diligence and research the electronic cigarette to see if this is something that will benefit you. Look at all sides of the story and try to get unbiased information. Right now the FDA appears to be biased against electronic smoking for some reason. Do they have a hidden agenda? Who knows… but I think I detect trace elements of BS in the FDA reports!

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Special Interest Deceptions Continue to Rampant About Electronic Cigarettes


As the battle continues over the electronic cigarette, more deceptive practices are being used to send out dangerously misleading information on the popular product.

GAINESVILLE, Fla., Dec. 17 /PRNewswire/ — Over the last few weeks there has been an increase of the amount of scare language that is used by e cigarette opposition in an attempt to scare the population concerning the electronic cigarette. Many are questioning the tactics of these groups when the evidence clearly shows that the product is indeed a safer alternative to tobacco according to several studies, lab reports and opinions from top medial and harm reduction specialist around the world.

Special interest groups appear to have no legitimate argument against the electronic cigarette and have stepped up the use of catch phrases like “an ingredient found in anti-freeze” to describe propylene glycol, when it is an that ingredient is also found in the food supply and asthma inhalers that children use on a daily basis.

There have also been statements from special interest on the dangers of nicotine and less than accurate information about this substance stating that nicotine in a vapor, even in low concentrations can cause cancer in bystanders. These statements are in direct contradiction of current scientific evidence.

“Nicotine is probably the second most used drug after caffeine.” Amazingly, no one thinks of caffeine as a harmful drug. Nor should they. “The possible dangers of nicotine are dwarfed by the dangers associated with tobacco. Pure nicotine has not been associated with the risk of cancer.” States The International Harm Reduction Association. “If one could entertain the unrealistic assumption that all tobacco users would switch to clean nicotine tomorrow, we would see an immediate effect (for the better) on cardiovascular disorders, and a delayed effect on respiratory and cancer disease.”

Produced by E Cigarettes National

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From Smoking to Vaping: Week 3


womansmoke

The transition from real cigarettes (analogs) to electronic cigarettes has been far easier than I ever could have anticipated. Smoking an e-cigarette gives you the same kind of enjoyment as smoking an analog. The nicotine liquid (e-liguid) keeps you from the physical cravings of a nicotine addiction, plus you use the same hand to mouth motions and inhaling and exhaling that you do with real cigarettes.

I am still smoking about 3 analogs per day, but there is such a noticeable difference now that I am not smoking 2 packs of real cigarettes per day. The major difference is the harshness and heat. When I smoke an analog, it feels very harsh on my throat and lungs and the heat is uncomfortable on my throat. The vapor produced by an electronic cigarette is not hot and not harsh … a much smoother smoke.

Another huge difference that I have noticed since week two is my sense of smell has returned. It’s amazing the things that I can smell now that I have not been able to smell for many years.

I’m also getting back my taste buds. Because they’ve been so desensitized by cigarettes for so many years, over time I’ve increased the amount of salt I put on foods just to be able to taste. Without thinking about it, I put the same amount of salt on food and found the food was way too salty, so I’ve decreased the amount of salt I’m eating.

My children are very positive and happy that I am giving these a go. They’ve been on my back to quit for years. Next week, one of my daughters will be coming to visit for the holidays and she also give the Super Cigarette a try. I’m hoping that it works out for her as well.

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Vaping It: Week 2


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I’m in the second week of “vaping” (the term that electronic cigarette users use for smoking electronic cigarettes). Honestly, I never expected this to be such a positive experience.

I bought a carton of analogs (real cigarettes) when I received my electronic cigarette in the mail. I’m such an addict that the thought of not having the option of smoking a real cigarette when I want one, panicked me. The first week of vaping was one of getting used to it and experimenting. This second week has been one of really enjoying it. I’ve experimented with several different liquid nicotine flavors and have got the whole process down pat and the experience is just like smoking … without all the stink and chemicals. My nicotine cravings are completely satisfied and I really enjoy the flavor of the vapor. I love the tobacco flavor called Marlboro and the one called USA Mix. I’ve heard others like the Winston flavor a lot. But I also got a vial of cola flavored and cherry flavored eliquid and mix them to make cherry coke flavor. It is a really refreshing vapor. Not overly sweet … still has the tobacco flavor but a nice cherry coke after taste.

I still have the analogs and have been smoking about 3 a day. I’m pretty sure they too will be phased out completely eventually. What is very noticeable is the awful smell and taste of a real cigarette after a week of vaping. The cigarette smoke burns my throat now and my sense of smell has returned. The real cigarette smoke also feels much harsher in my lungs now. I am breathing easier and coughing less.

I didn’t anticipate feeling any physical effects such as the sense of smell returning this early in the game, but it is a real bonus. It appears that it doesn’t take very long to actually feel the effects of the “almost” quitting the real cigarettes with all those chemicals. I still reach for one first thing in the morning. This morning, I did and started smoking it. When I stood up, I felt slightly dizzy, just like I did when I was a 16-year old teenager, just starting to smoke.

My brother is a smoker also and he rolls his own. His tobacco is very strong and harsh. I gave him a Super Cigarette Starter Kit and he instantly took to it. He liked it. He was out of tobacco and vaped all day yesterday.

Then he went to the store and bought a can of tobacco. I was hoping that it would be like me … just security having it there. But today, his electronic cigarette is nowhere in sight and he is back to the tobacco. He was so positive about it yesterday that I thought he might eventually be a convert also, but now I’m not sure. I really hope so because his cough is worse than mine was, since he is smoking such a harsh tobacco product. I can now smell his tobacco in the living room when I pass through and it’s pretty rank.

One of my daughters is a smoker also. She’ll be here for the Thanksgiving holidays. I’m going to give her one of the Super Cigarette Starter Kits also and hope that she will enjoy it and be able to quit smoking using it. She has a brand new baby and neither her or her baby needs that smoke.

One thing I really don’t miss is getting literally robbed by the government with their enormous tax on tobacco products. This is really much cheaper than smoking analogs (about 80% cheaper).

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From Smoking to Vaping: Week 1


e-cigarettesThis is my own personal account of my experience with e-cigarettes. I have been smoking since I was 16 and am a two pack per day smoker. At times in the past, I have smoked even more than that.

My mother died of lung cancer a couple of years ago. Anyone who is with a loved one and cares for someone with lung cancer, will have no choice but to at least consider quitting smoking. I’ve literally tried everything on the market, including nicotine patches and nicotine gum. I continued to smoke while using nicotine patches, which actually increased my addiction to nicotine.

Recently I’ve become aware of electronic cigarettes and started reading some of the materials available about them. I did a lot of research into costs, benefits, health concerns, etc.

I decided to give them a try and ordered the Super Cigarette Starter Kit. It’s cost was much less than the $150 to over $200 being charged by companies in malls and on the Net, and it’s the same, basic product. So, if you’re considering trying e-cigarettes out, don’t pay more money than you need to.

Day 1: I immediately started using it after receiving it and since I was experimenting with it, I had only a couple of real cigarettes that day. That night I began to feel ill and went to bed. I had chills and a headache for about half the night, and then began to feel better. The next morning I was back to normal. I asked some questions in an e-cigarette forum and discovered that my reaction was most likely due to nicotine withdrawal, since it’s likely that I had been smoking at a higher level of nicotine than I did on Day 1 of smoking e-cigarettes.

Week 1: During this week, I’ve experimented with different eliquid (nicotine liquid in e-cigarettes) “flavors” ranging from flu-cured tobacco to Marlboro to other flavors. I found that I really enjoyed the Marlboro flavor and a novelty flavor that I purchased.

The feeling and taste of using an e-cigarette is very much like real smoking. The vapor looks like smoke, but without the nasty odor of cigarette smoke. You’re definitely going to smell better smoking e-cigarettes and so is your car and house. The nicotine liquid keeps me from the typical cravings you would expect if you were quitting smoking. There are no cravings at all and it is a completely comfortable experience.

I also noticed my sinuses clearing and my sense of smell beginning to return. My lungs feel better also. I’m using the 24 mg. cartridges (high dose), since I was a pretty heavy smoker of real cigarettes. I also ordered numerous different flavors of eliquid and now refill the cartridges rather than just replace the cartridges when emptied. This is going to save even more money, plus you can experiment with flavors. I ordered a vial of “coke” flavored and “cherry” flavored eliquid and combined them for a refreshing “cherry coke” flavored vapor. It still tastes like tobacco, but there’s a hint of cherry coke aftertaste that is very pleasant.

Am I worried about children being attracted to these novelty flavors? Not really. If a child wants a cherry coke, it’s much cheaper just to pop into a Sheetz or 7-11 and buy a cherry coke. Why would a child search the Internet for flavored nicotine liquid, unless they were already smokers? Anyone who smokes knows that nicotine is an addicting substance and that these products are not meant for children or pregnant women. The FDA would have you believe that simply because some novelty flavors are available, that they are being marketed to children. That simply is not the case. Do they think that adults who are already addicted to nicotine do not like flavors? Quite simply, they do and that is who they are being marketed to. I haven’t been a child for quite some time but I love the cherry coke flavor. I doubt that a non-smoking teen would enjoy their cherry coke laced with a tobacco flavor, when they can enjoy a refreshing cherry coke soda from the local convenience store.

So that’s my experience with e-cigarettes for the first week. I’ll follow up with some posts on my progress and experiences with “vaping” and some e-cigarette tips in my next posts.

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List of Identified, Known Carcinogens in Electronic Cigarettes vs. Conventional Cigarettes


waste

List of Identified, Known Carcinogens in Electronic Cigarettes vs. Conventional Cigarettes, and Which Anti-Smoking Groups are Telling Smokers to Smoke

Based on the best available scientific evidence, I have compiled a list of the identified, known carcinogens present at greater than trace quantities in electronic cigarettes compared to conventional cigarettes.

Below that list is a table listing a number of anti-smoking organizations and which of the two products they have stated or implied they would prefer that smokers smoke.

Table 1. List of Identified, Known Carcinogens in Electronic Cigarettes, Present at More than Trace Levels (defined as 1 nanogram per cigarette)

None

Table 2. List of Identified, Known Carcinogens in Tobacco Cigarettes, Present at More than Trace Levels (defined as 1 nanogram per cigarette)

Benz(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(j)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Dibenz(a,h)anthracene
Dibenzo(a,l)pyrene
Dibenzo(a,e)pyrene
Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene
Quinolineb
Dibenz(a,j)acridine
Benzo(b)furan
Furan
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
N -Nitrosoethylmethylamine
N -Nitrosodiethylamine
N -Nitroso-di-n-butylamine
N -Nitrosopyrrolidine
N -Nitrosopiperidine
N -Nitrosodiethanolamine
N -Nitrosonornicotine
4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone
2-Toluidine
2,6-Dimethylaniline
2-Naphthylamine
4-Aminobiphenyl
AaC
PhIP
Formaldehyde
Acetaldehyde
1,3-Butadiene
Isoprene
Benzene
Styrene
Acetamide
Acrylamide
Acrylonitrile
Vinyl chloride
DDT
DDE
Catechol
Caffeic acid
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine
2-Nitropropane
Nitrobenzene
Ethyl carbamate
Ethylene oxide
Propylene oxide
Methyleugenol
Hydrazine
Arsenic
Nickel
Chromium
Cadmium
Lead
Polonium-210

Source: http://tobaccoanalysis.blogspot.com/2009/07/list-of-identified-known-carcinogens-in.html

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